Thermaltake 350w PurePower Fanless PSU Review

purepower

Introduction

I can’t tell you how long I have been waiting for a good 0dB power supply to be on the market. I remember thinking to myself years and years ago, “why hasn’t anyone made a 0dB PSU?” Well recently companies have been doing just that and I hope it continues. This power supply which is model W0029 is 350w of silence and by some it could be called small compared to many of the heavy duty 500+w units on the market. However while this power supply may lack in brute force power it more than makes up in its silence. This power supply also has a good number of electrical features that include: thermal overload, short circuit, current overload, and over voltage-protection.

The first thing I noted about the box was the fact that is much larger than your “typical” power supply. Because of the heatpipe design this PSU uses the unit is larger and so is the box. Both the front and back of the box provide information on specifications and features that the power supply has. The box also has a handle on it so you can easily carry the power supply.

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Within the box the power supply is heavily padded with thick foam around the entire unit. Also packed into the box is a power cord, four screws, and a manual. The manual is small but does provide a lot of good information on what everything is, does, and how to install it.

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This power supply definitely looks unique in design and is a first in the computer industry. There are only a handful of passive power supplies on the market right now and this is the only one I have seen that uses technology like this. The cables of the power supply are sleeved and color coded for each type of connector used. Doing this will keep everything more tidy within your case and allow for better airflow. Having the cables color coded is also nice to easily pick out the type of connector you need. Not only is the organization of the cabling great but it has a lot of connections. The following connectors on this power supply are as follows: (1) 20-pin ATX, (1) 4-pin 12v, (9) 4-pin Molex, (2) 4-pin floppy, and (2) 4-pin SATA. With SATA starting to be used more heavily and eventually phasing out IDE it’s nice to see native SATA power connectors on this power supply.

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The power supply is quite heavy as it should be because of the amount of passive cooling used. There are a lot of techniques used on this power supply to cool it since there is no fan involved. Two heatpipes run through the power supply and transfer heat to 8 copper fins on the front of the power supply. The heatpipes also work with the housing of the power supply that made of aluminum rather than steel to dissipate heat better. This aluminum housing also has air vents all over the unit to allow air to flow through it.

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On the back of the power supply are 26 more copper fins connected to the two heatpipes running through the unit. These copper fins will dissipate heat to the outside of the case to keep the internal air temperature as low as possible. This section of copper fins is protected by an aluminum mask that is connected to the body of the power supply to also help with convection of heat to the outside of the case.

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By removing a few screws from the aluminum housing I opened up this passive power supply. There are two very large aluminum heatsinks that are connected to the two heatpipes that lead to the outside of the power supply. You can get a better view of the heatpipe running through the power supply from the second picture below. There were no design or production flaws that I found on the inside or outside of the unit which is what I expected from Thermaltake.

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