Archive for Category: "Linux Tips"

How to Discover Disk Usage in Linux

How to Discover Disk Usage in Linux

While Linux has a reputation of being hard to use, modern versions up the usability ante beyond the most popular devices. You can still do some very powerful things with traditional text commands, but there are some even more powerful GUI tools available.

How to fix Video Stuttering on Pivos Xios with XBMC

How to fix Video Stuttering on Pivos Xios with XBMC

There’s nothing really wrong with the Xios, You just have to tweak some settings to get around some limitations.

How to Connect XBMC Linux to Synology Diskstation NAS

How to Connect XBMC Linux to Synology Diskstation NAS

One problem you may face with an XBMC Linux installation (or appliance running XBMC) is connecting to and scraping your media that resides on a NAS. You have to do a little tweak to your Diskstation to get XBMC (and some other appliances) to work.

How to Split Linux Log Files by Day or Month

How to Split Linux Log Files by Day or Month

Unless your admins took the extra care to automatically separate your log files by date, then you may have noticed one huge-ass log file in your web page’s directory… especially if it isn’t compressed.

Symbolic Links: Easily Increase Your NAS’ uPNP Library

Symbolic Links: Easily Increase Your NAS’ uPNP Library

Many full-features Linux-based Networked Attached Storage (NAS) devices support a plethora of multimedia features.  Many have native support as an iTunes server, web server, ftp server, photo share, and Universal Plug n Play (UPNP) server.  UPNP allows devices such as the Playstation 3, Xbox 360, Squeezebox, and many other streaming clients to play your music […]

Linux Firewall Part 6: Overcoming Email Server Problems

Linux Firewall Part 6: Overcoming Email Server Problems

As discussed in our article “Why Build a Linux Firewall“, there are many advantages to having a custom-built firewall appliance in your home.  While these Linux distributions are easy to set up and have nice User Interfaces, they still have some problems. Not every feature of Linux is exposed in the GUI, so while these firewalls are […]

Linux Firewall Part 5: The GUI Interface

Linux Firewall Part 5: The GUI Interface

Now that you have IPcop installed, you need to configure it.  IPcop provies you with a web interface in which you can configure nearly all of the settings of your new firewall.  To connect, just open up any web browser, and connect to the IP address you set up when you installed the software.  The […]

Linux Firewall Part 3: Selecting Your Hardware

Linux Firewall Part 3: Selecting Your Hardware

As mentioned in the previous segment, you can create a professional-level firewall using old hardware that you would otherwise throw away. Some people may choose to purchase new dedicated hardware, which can have several advantages. Either way, you can create a hardware firewall costs significantly less than the $1000-$3000 that professional hardware devices can cost. […]

Linux Firewall Part 2: Determine Your Network Setup

Linux Firewall Part 2: Determine Your Network Setup

Many firewalls make certain assumptions and use several standard conventions.  Understand the standard terminologies and you’ll have an easier time when setting up your firewall. Nearly every firewall’s first level of protection is NAT, or Network Address Translation.  This means that an external address is “translated” from external to internal addresses, so the public never has […]

Building a Linux Firewall Part 1: Why?

Building a Linux Firewall Part 1: Why?

There’s no doubt that the internet today is more powerful than ever… and great power demands great responsibility.  There are threats everywhere that you need to protect yourself, your family, and your hardware from.  Not only do you have to worry about hackers, viruses, and spammers, but you need to worry about sexual predators and inappropriate content for […]

Linux Firewall Part 4: Installation

Linux Firewall Part 4: Installation

For the purposes of this turotial, I am making several assumptions.  I am assuming that your green network is 192.168.1.x and your orange network is 192.168.15.x.  If you want a different network config, then modify as necessary. If you already have an Internet Router that you’re intending to replace, I recommend some prep-work to make things […]

Linux: A Complete Overview

Linux: A Complete Overview

This article will discuss the differences between the Linux and Windows operating softwares; we discuss some of the pros and cons of each system. Let us first start out with a general overview of the Linux operating system. Linux at its most basic form is a computer kernel. The Kernel is the underlying computer code, […]

Linux isn't that hard

Linux isn’t that hard. Grab and old desktop and play around with it if you can. I’d suggest Debian – it has more of a learning curve but it’s also more consistant. And by consistant I meant that once you learn how to configure one program, you can configure all of them (unlike RedHat with […]

UNIX

UNIX was owned by AT&T’s Bell Labs until the late 80′s/early 90′s when it was spun off and then a copyright argument ensued when Novell bought it up. “Unix” and “unix” are owned by Novell and “UNIX” is owned by a 3rd party holding company and they are also quite different products. “UNIX” is the […]

Apache's Granularity

You can run about 65,000 different webservers (if that many existed), since the most important thing is that they run on different ports. If you run Apache on 8000 or 8080 or something like that and IIS on 80 then you’re all set. Or don’t run both simultaneously, that works too. I tried IIS 6.0 […]

Apache as a web server

You know, just a comment … IMHO, if you know how to edit a config file at all you’re better with Apache. It’s nice and clean and lets you change everything with a config and a server reboot. IIS is still a little on the big side for people doing basic webserving in anything but […]